Check Out
AboutInternationalAffiliate ProgramGift CertificatesShipping OptionsTennis Pro Shop





  Tennis Racquets
 By Price & Specifications
 Babolat Tennis Racquets
 Dunlop Tennis Racquets
 Head Tennis Racquets
 Prince Tennis Racquets
 Pro Kennex Tennis Racquets
 Tecnifibre Tennis Racquets
 Wilson Tennis Racquets
 Yonex Tennis Racquets
 Junior Tennis Racquets
 Helpfull Tips, Links

  Tennis Apparel
Women's Tennis Apparel
Men's Tennis Apparel
Junior's Tennis Apparel

  Tennis Shoes
Men's
adidas
ASICS
Babolat
Head
K-Swiss
Lotto
New Balance
Prince
Wilson
Junior's
Women's
adidas
ASICS
Babolat
Head
K-Swiss
New Balance
Prince
Wilson
Junior's

  Clearance

  Tennis Bags

  Tennis Strings

  Accessories

  Racquetball Racquets

  Squash Racquets

  Shipping Options

  Affiliate Program

  Tennis Lessons

  Tennis Pro Shop

  Discontinued Products

  Privacypolicy
  Index

[ Store Home > Tennis Racquets > Helpfull Tips, Links > Tennis Elbow ]

Tennis Elbow

What is Tennis Elbow?
[Skeletal Arm] Tennis elbow is an injury to the muscles and tendons on the outside (lateral aspect) of the elbow that results from overuse or repetitive stress. The narrowing of the muscle bellies of the forearm as they merge into the tendons create highly focused stress where they insert into the bone of the elbow.

Mechanism of Injury


Lateral epicondylitis
Injury to the lateral aspect of the elbow is the most common upper extremity tennis injury. Tennis elbow is generally caused by overuse of the extensor tendons of the forearm, particularly the extensor carpi radialis brevis. Commonly experienced by the amateur player, this injury is often a result of (1) a one-handed backhand with poor technique (the ball is hit with the front of the shoulder up and power generated from the forearm muscles), (2) a late forehand swing preparation with resulting wrist snap to bring the racquet head perpendicular to the ball, or (3) while serving, the ball is hit with full power and speed with wrist pronation (palm turned downward) and wrist snap which increases the stress on the already taught extensor tendons.

Medial epicondylitis
Medial epicondylitis is less common and characteristically occurs with wrist flexor activity and pronation. Medial epicondylitis can result from (1) late forehand biomechanics where the player quickly snaps the wrist to bring the racquet head forward, (2) the back-scratch or cocking phase when serving, which places tremendous stress on the medial tissues of the elbow, (3) in the right elbow of a right-handed golf swing by throwing the club head down at the ball with the right arm rather than pulling the club through with the left arm and trunk (also referred to as "golfers elbow"), or (4) improper pulling technique with certain swim strokes, especially the backstroke (also referred to as "swimmers elbow").

It should be kept in mind that elbow epicondylitis is not limited to those persons playing tennis, golf, baseball or swimming and can result from any activity that puts the lateral or medial compartments of the elbow under similar repetitive stress and strain (e.g., hammering, turning a key, screw driver use, computer work, excessive hand shaking).



Signs and Symptoms

General
Difficulty holding onto, pinching, or gripping objects
Pain, stiffness, or insufficient elbow and hand movement
Forearm muscle tightness
Insufficient forearm functional strength
Point tenderness at or near the insertion sites of the muscles of the lateral or medial elbow




More Information: http://www.nismat.org/ptcor/tennis_elbow/



Aircast Armband
Aircast Armband

Suggested: $16.99
Our price: $13.99


We accept all major credit cards and PayPal.

Your order is placed online through the secure server ecommerce provided by Yahoo! Small Business



Copyright © 2000-2013 Tennis Boom Inc. - 225 Rt. 18 South, East Brunswick, NJ 08816
Phone: 1.800.336.8180